THE HEART OF THE MATTER
a special program of the National Emergency Medicine Association (NEMA) 

Transcripts: 568.1 to 568.3

Week: 568.1 Guest: Dr. Thurma McCann, Spokeswoman, Div. of Health Start, DHHS Topic: New prenatal care hotline/referral service (part one of three) Producer/Host: Steve Girard

NEMA: Prenatal care news...coming up...

SPOT: For 15 years, the National Emergency Medicine Association has worked against stroke, heart disease and trauma. Join the effort, call 800-332-6362.

NEMA: The Department of Health and Human Services' Division of Healthy Start has a new, toll free number for new mothers to be...which puts them in touch with answers and help in every area...you'll see the number 1-800-311-BABY in TV advertising...

McCANN: And the information line that is answered will be in that particular person's community... from wherever they've called. They also may be able to get referrals to other agencies where they can get further care.

NEMA: Dr. Thurma McCann....did you know 25% of women still fail to get prenatal care for the first three months of their pregnancy... and that relates directly to the 33 thousand babies who die during their first year? Dr. McCann says we can do better. Also available is another line for Hispanic women...1-800-504-7081...

McCANN: ...which is answered completely in Spanish and all the materials that are given out, and all the referrals that will be made on that line will be to Spanish providers.

NEMA: Just one call improves your baby's chances. 1-800-311-BABY. I'm Steve Girard at The Heart of the Matter.

Transcripts:

Week: 568.2 Guest: Dr. Thurma McCann, Spokeswoman, Div. of Health Start, DHHS Topic: Disparity in black/white infant mortality (part two of three) Producer/Host: Steve Girard

NEMA: Reducing infant mortality...coming up...

SPOT: NEMA...the National Emergency Medicine Association...fights our worst health enemies - heart disease, stroke, trauma. Call 800-332-6362.

NEMA: While the tragedy of infant mortality has greatly declined in America, each year 33 thousand babies still don't make it to their first birthday. Dr. Thurma McCann of the government's Division of Healthy Start says one of the main reasons the number is still high is black infants are dying at a rate 2 to 3 times higher than white infants...

McCANN: We've been able to determine or recognize that issues such as outreach and economic development programs and community motivation makes a difference but there are other issues such as stress and bacterial infections in the vaginal area that cause early delivery that we haven't quite been able to really work with yet. Many of the studies are just beginning to show an implication that some of these issues play a real role in contributing to our black infant death in this country.

NEMA: The 5 year Healthy Start Initiative, active in 22 communities around the country, now has a toll free, one source number for prenatal questions and help in the caller's community: 1-800-311-BABY. I'm Steve Girard at The Heart of the Matter.

Transcripts:

Week: 568.3 Guest: Dr. Thurma McCann, Spokeswoman, Div. of Health Start, DHHS Topic: SIDS deaths decline (part three of three) Producer/Host: Steve Girard

NEMA: A simple change reduces SIDS...up next...

SPOT: 15 years in the prevention of heart disease, stroke and trauma. The National Emergency Medicine Association. Call 800-332-6362.

NEMA: The number of deaths from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome has gone way down....Dr. Thurma McCann of the Health and Human Services' Division of Healthy Start...

McCANN: We think that part of the reason for that is our Back to Sleep campaign. That was the new recommendation from providers that all parents, when putting their infants down to sleep, should put them on their backs.

NEMA: The Division of Healthy Start aims at preventing possible causes of SIDS and other life stealing infant maladies by getting a mom to get early care...

McCANN: Early and continuous prenatal care can help us to determine if there are other kinds of problems that put a woman at risk during her pregnancy that can be taken care of, such as smoking, that we can address early on in pregnancy, and we're also very concerned about second-hand smoke in the home, and how that affects infants and how that may have some impact on Sudden Infant Death as well.

NEMA: The Division of Healthy Start has a new, toll free, one source number for prenatal questions, help and referrals: 1-800-311-BABY. I'm Steve Girard at The Heart of the Matter.