"THE HEART OF THE MATTER"
a special program of the National Emergency Medicine Association (NEMA)


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Transcripts: 572.1 to 572.3

Week: 572.1 Guest: Dr. Mark Perloe, Atlanta Reproductive Health Center Topic: Tools to help fertility Producer/Host: Steve Girard

NEMA: Getting help in making babies...coming up...

SPOT: For 15 years, the National Emergency Medicine Association has worked against stroke, heart disease and trauma. Join the effort, call 800-332-6362.

NEMA: Dr. Mark Perloe of the Atlanta Reproductive Health Centre considers the physical and emotional aspects when couples have trouble conceiving a child... one of the medical routes that offers success is in vitro fertilization...

PERLOE: Using medication to get more eggs, with a simple procedure performed under local anesthetic, with sedation... mixing those eggs with the sperm, and translating a few of the embryos back into the uterus. That's a wonderful technique if the tubes are bad, or if there's unexplained infertility. ICSI is the procedure where a single sperm is injected into the egg. We are increasingly adopting this because we get such good fertilization rates, and good pregnancy rates with it.

NEMA: Dr. Perloe says the highly individualized procedures can run between 8 to 15 thousand dollars. If you're having trouble getting pregnant, you should check your general health with your doctor... then see an specialist experienced in infertility. I'm Steve Girard at The Heart of the Matter.

Transcripts:

Week: 572.2 Guest: Dr. Mark Perloe, Atlanta Reproductive Health Center Topic: Confirming infertility, where to go Producer/Host: Steve Girard

NEMA: Many facets of infertility...coming up...

SPOT: NEMA...the National Emergency Medicine Association... fights our worst health enemies - heart disease, stroke, trauma. Call 800-332-6362

NEMA: You've been trying for about a year now... and still, not pregnant. Why? Well, Dr. Mark Perloe of the Atlanta Reproductive Health Centre says check with your doctor before going to a specialist...

PERLOE: A visit to their physician may pick up a medication that might interfere with the pregnancy. Smoking ought to be discontinued if possible, alcohol use should be decreased. So it's important that a couple trying to conceive make sure they're up to date in routine health care.

NEMA: So, after a couple checks on general health with their physician, and finds they may have a problem, what should they do next?

PERLOE: Well I think it's to find a physician who is competent and experienced in dealing with infertility, and to recognize that this is a problem that involves both husband and wife, it's not just the wife's problem.

NEMA: Check out Dr. Perloe's web site: www.ivf.com/... with great information and links to many sources on infertility. I'm Steve Girard at The Heart of the Matter.

Transcripts:

Week: 572.3 Guest: Dr. Mark Perloe, Atlanta Reproductive Health Center Topic: The Stress and emotions in infertility Producer/Host: Steve Girard

NEMA: The stress and emotion of infertility...coming up...

SPOT: NEMA...the National Emergency Medicine Association... fights our worst health enemies - heart disease, stroke, trauma. Call 800-332-6362.

NEMA: Dr. Mark Perloe of the Atlanta Reproductive Health Centre is an expert in infertility evaluation and treatment... there are many wonderful tools to help couples have children... but he says there's a line he has to walk...

PERLOE: ...as a physician, I have to recognize that the process of infertility treatment potentially can destroy the family... unless there the resources available to help the couple. And it's incumbent upon me to kind of keep my finger on the pulse of the marriage

NEMA: Dr. Perloe says it's crucial for couples to discuss the situation and their feelings...

PERLOE: There's less likely to be conflicts when the husband says," well I'm doing this for her", and she says," well if we would only have kids... boy, the relationship would be better"... or... "I could quit my job." And focusing on the reasons to go through fertility treatment is very important for couples.

NEMA: ...between 65 and 85 percent eventually get pregnant, but Dr. Perloe believes that even those who are not successful become better adjusted to their situation. I'm Steve Girard at The Heart of the Matter.

 

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Last modified: May 05, 2022